Even a half-sibling with colon cancer is a high risk factor

Half-siblings of people with colon cancer have nearly the same colon cancer risk as full siblings do — a 6% cumulative lifetime risk compared with 7% — and a higher risk than other second-degree relatives have, researchers recently reported. The risk may be due both to genetics and to shared environmental factors, and the finding

Colorectal cancer behaves differently in young patients

Colorectal cancer is noted to be on the rise in younger patients. This is concerning as rates have steadily declined in other age groups. Although a small percentage overall, the rate of most marked rise in colon cancer is seen in the 20’s. New research suggests colorectal cancer is clinically different in younger patients. The

Does not remembering a procedure make it OK?

An article from New York Times, discusses the possibility of PTSD resulting from unremembered medical procedures using medications like midazolam. Is this possible? I believe it is. If people can be traumatized by injury, sexual assault, and childhood abuse that they have repressed from their memories completely, then why not?

To lower the age of screening colonoscopy, or not?

The recent issue of Clinical Gastroenterology & Hepatology addresses the American Cancer Society’s new recommendation to lower the age of initial screening for colon cancer from 50 to 45.  The recommendation follows a small spike in younger patients having colon cancer. However, those patients are not necessarily 45-50. Actually, patients in their 20’s are the

Bariatric surgery linked to higher colorectal cancer risk

Bariatric surgery doubles a patient’s risk for colorectal cancer, UK researchers reported in the British Journal of Surgery. Researchers studied a cohort of 8,794 patients who underwent gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy or gastric banding. However, bariatric surgery was also associated with a five-fold decrease in the risk of hormone-related cancers (breast, endometrium, and prostate).  The

Colonoscopy starting age changed to 45

In response to an increase in colorectal cancer rates in younger people, the American Cancer Society released a change in its screening guidelines to recommend adults at average risk begin CRC screening starting at age 45 instead of 50. Not all health societies, government models, or payors have responded yet. However, the news does reflect

US cancer incidence, mortality rates decreasing

The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer found cancer diagnoses and deaths in the US overall have been decreasing for men and women, mainly due to better treatments, prevention and screening in colorectal, lung and breast cancers. Prostate cancer death rates stabilized, however, after years of decline, and cases of oral