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Dividing Crohn’s Into Small Bowel and Colonic Diseases?

Parambir S. Dulai, MD, and colleagues at the Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego have written a thoughtful discussion on the problem with phenotypes in Crohn’s disease. We have long known that there are different types of disease, aggressiveness factors, and presentations. However, we tend to think of Crohn’s as one disease. Is

FDA warns companies selling medicinal CBD products

With state-by-state legalization of cannabis products, comes a surge in purported medical benefits. But caution remains that the interest in cannabinoids will lead to the old “snake oil” type of cure-all claims. The FDA has only approved one product containing CBD, for the treatment of of a specific type of seizures. Warning letters from the

Anti-TNF therapy in early pregnancy tied to preeclampsia

“We know that women with inflammatory bowel disease when they are pregnant are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes,” Sunanda V. Kane, MD, a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting. Control of IBD has been felt to be fundamental for

Multidisciplinary care for severe IBS shows improvement over GI care alone

An abstract presented this year at DDW supports the benefit of a multidisciplinary approach for those with severe functional GI disorders. To test the efficacy of a multidisciplinary care approach, researchers recruited 35 patients with a severe manifestation of a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) — defined as having symptoms for more than 3 years that

Liver enzymes tied to Alzheimer’s

A study in JAMA Network Open found that higher AST to ALT liver enzyme ratios, reduced ALT levels, and higher alkaline phosphatase readings were associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Specific markers such as poor cognition, elevated amyloid-beta accumulation, increased brain atrophy, and lower brain glucose metabolism were noted. The findings were based on PET, MRI, and